There’s a Subway System Beneath Moscow That’s So Secret, No One’s Even Sure It Exists

Eugin and his associates came to a halt around a manhole cover located in a public park somewhere in Moscow, Russia. It was time, they felt, to lift it up and brave the dark and dank far underground. Their aim? To try to uncover the truth, once and for all, about one of the Soviet era’s biggest and eeriest secrets. Does Metro-2 really exist?

The small team was out to prove that this long-standing urban legend was indeed true, and so they clambered down through the manhole and into the tunnels beneath. They had flashlights, and they wore protective clothing to help them through the underground’s murky waters.

So what exactly were they looking for down there? Interestingly, “Metro-2” is an alleged secret subway system that is believed to have been devised by the elite Soviet leadership in the mid-to-late 1900s.

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Indeed, this rumored subway is said to have been built with the primary purpose of transporting senior Communist leaders across the Russian capital in safety, without awakening the public or any suspected enemies to their movements. Top secret doesn’t even cover it.

It has also been alleged that the system was constructed to enable Soviet top dogs, such as the tyrannical Joseph Stalin, to survive a nuclear attack. Certainly, if such a thing exists, it could have been an elaborate escape route should the Cold War have suddenly turned dangerously hot.

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In fact, the rumored subway system is believed to have been green-lighted sometime under Stalin’s lengthy rule from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953. This was a period when tensions in his own party, and between Russia and the United States and its allies, were hugely significant.

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Metro-2, then, is supposedly a far-reaching complex of tunnels and tracks that run from the Kremlin all the way across to former KGB bases and Stalin’s personal homes. Eugin himself alleged to the BBC in 2005 that the system extended for 15.5 miles and ended in the Russian city’s suburbs.

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It has also been widely claimed that the mysterious subway, which is thought to run parallel to the actual public subway system in Moscow, was codenamed “D-6” by the Russian Secret Police, the KGB. Though, no one has elaborated on what that might signify.

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Even more intriguingly, however, is the suggestion that Metro-2 is much larger than the public subway and actually consists of four tracks that go 650 feet undeground. It’s further been said that there is a subterranean town down there called Ramenki. But does any of it even exist?

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Not officially it doesn’t. Neither the Russian government nor the Federal Security Service (FSB) have confirmed or denied the secret subway. Perhaps tellingly, though, the BBC claimed that the FSB had already brought in and questioned one inquisitive journalist who dared to write about Metro-2.

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So, with the Russian top brass effectively keeping its lips sealed, it has been largely left to intrepid urban explorers like Eugin to look for answers. Indeed, it was the so-called Diggers of the Underground Planet that were believed to have discovered a way into to the system in the mid-1990s.

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Eugin himself has shown journalists the photographs he reportedly took of Metro-2. They detail a fascinating journey through great tunnels, with underground rail tracks and creepy lighting. He has also claimed to have followed them way out of the city.

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What none of these urban explorers or conspiracy theorists have explained, though, is exactly how such a vast complex was built. Surely an operation as big as this could never have gone unnoticed? Perhaps an official report could shed some light on this…

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In fact, a 1991 U.S. Department of Defense report entitled Military Forces in Transition focused a number of passages specifically to the mysterious Metro-2. This report came just as the Soviet Union faltered, and it is a fascinating document.

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The report stated, for instance, that the Soviets had “constructed deep-underground both in urban Moscow and outside the city.” It further claimed that several “facilities are interconnected by a network of deep interconnected subway lines that provide a quick and secure means of evacuation for the leadership.”

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What’s more, these facilities, according to the report, were “intended for the national command authority in wartime.” The paper additionally estimated that the complexes could be as far as 980 feet underground and could house approximately 10,000 people.

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But it’s not just U.S. officials that have spoken out about Metro-2. Indeed, a handful of former Soviet government officers, administrative types and spies have also stepped forward to offer information to curious journalists and interested publications.

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One such official is Vladimir Shevchenko, who has previously served as an advisor to final Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev as well as current Russian president Vladimir Putin. Shevchenko, though, said that Metro-2 consisted of only one underground line between the Kremlin and Stalin’s Volynskoye address, while additional links connected other government facilities.

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In 2001, meanwhile, a former KGB colonel called Oleg Gordievsky told Russian newspaper Argumenty i Fakty, “You still do not know the main KGB secret yet: a huge underground city, a whole communications network of such facilities. But they will not show you.”

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Finally, in 2006, when the noted Rossiya Hotel was demolished, builders there reported that they had stumbled across secret tunnels below its foundations, and it was a space large enough for several thousand people. Whatever the full extent of the underground system, then, it appears that Moscow has some very dark secrets from its Soviet past lying underneath.

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