A Man Chose To Remove His Comatose Wife From Life Support. But Then Hours Later She Began To Mumble

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Image: YouTube/FacingLifeHeadOn

Dr. Schoeffler continued, “[For] all of our patients who come in with a cardiac arrest, we started a hypothermic protocol in 2003… [You’re] supported on a ventilator, paralyzed and sedated so that you can’t shiver to generate body heat.” Keeping the body temperature down, you see, is vital for a patient’s recovery after they have suffered a cardiac arrest. How so? Well, it’s all to do with the brain.

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Yes, it’s the brain that benefits the most from the cooling process in cases like Jill’s. “You basically chill the body – and more importantly the brain – for about 24 [to] 36 hours,” Dr. Schoeffler explained. The objective is to hopefully avoid neurological damage as a result of a cardiac arrest.

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